So ready for spring

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It finally feels like spring is here.¬†From 12 o’clock, moving clockwise: dandelion, Barbarea vulgaris, Allium tricoccum, Allium vineale, hosta. Yellow flowers are Ficaria verna, which must be cooked to remove a toxin – this is a new one to me this year. To its left is very young Lepidium virginicum (peppergrass), below that is Daucus carota. The green leaves resembling curly dock are young horseradish leaves. The pale blue green succulent in the center is sedum, probably Autumn Joy. All gathered on an evening stroll through our yard.

Decluttered and rearranged the contents of two outbuildings. Sorted through thirty years’ worth of photos and personal ephemera. Did a dump run, threw out half a trash bag full of old photos, cards, and letters; other things – including furniture – donated or given away.

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Wood stove cooking, and a lesson about limes

So I succeeded in cooking a pot of beans on our wood stove. Unfortunately, I also learned (the hard way) that lime rind imparts intense bitterness. I have a favorite recipe for beans that calls for tossing in a halved, unpeeled orange and, not having any oranges handy but still wanting the brightness of citrus, I tossed in a halved, unpeeled lime that was languishing in a bowl on my kitchen counter. Big mistake. Ruined the whole batch, including a really nice smoked ham hock. My husband gamely wolfed down a couple of bowls spiked with great lashings of hot sauce, but finally conceded that it was pretty awful. As much as I hate to waste food, I tossed the rest.

Still – I cooked a thing on our wood stove!